bansuri

Nowadays in India the same kind of bansuri is played, like thousands of years ago. In its simplicity, being just one piece of bamboo with six holes and one hole to blow in, this flute is so perfect, that it hardly needed further development until today. It is possible playing all the twelve semitones, a perfect chromatic scale. For each keynote you need a different bansuri-size. Therefore at least twelve bansuri-flutes are necessary. In opposition to the western flute the bansuri enables glissando-playing, a characteristic element of the classical Indian music. The bansuri is a sacred instrument, it is associated with the Hindu god Krishna, who played it by himself and - according to the legend - brought the transverse flutes into the world. The modern flute with its complex Böhm-system in comparison to the bansuri has the advantage that every scale is possible to play on one single instrument. A pecularity is the using of the alto flute in G, which is built in a bigger size - in width as well as in length. It enriches the spectrum of sound and combines excellently with the sound of a low bansuri.














 
   
  Dinesh
Mishra
   
  bansuri
   
  bamboo
   
  back
   
Stephanie
Lepp
 
   
western
concert
flute
 
   
silver